Date of Award

2013

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS) in Psychology: Clinical

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Jonathan Anderson

Second Advisor

William Williams

Third Advisor

Ann LeBar

Abstract

"This study examines the relationship between an individual's ability to accurately estimate the passage of time and his or her ability to delay gratification. In this study, undergraduate students were asked to estimate time intervals using a time estimation computer program and to provide a verbal estimation of time intervals. These scores were then correlated with delay of gratification measures, designated by their score on a delay of gratification inventory, and their decision to receive extra credit points immediately and end their participation, or to return and collect an additional half of their reward a day later. It was expected that there would a positive correlation between time estimation and delay of gratification and that there would be a positive correlation between time estimation measures and between delay of gratification measures. The findings of this study were not consistent with the expected outcome, but assist in guiding the direction of future research concerning perception of time and factors influencing decision-making processes"--Document.

Comments

Typescript. Vita.

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