Date of Award

2013

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts in Music (MA)

Department

Music

First Advisor

Sheila Woodward

Second Advisor

Randal Wagner

Third Advisor

Ielleen Miller

Abstract

"This case study investigated perceptions on process and outcomes of applying the Alexander Technique in vocal production. The setting was the campus of a state university in the United States of America. The perceptions of three levels of participants were investigated- a master Alexander Technique teacher, a collegiate vocal professor and three undergraduate music students, all experienced in the Alexander Technique in vocal production. Data collection included interviews with the participants; documentation in student practice journals, and field observations. Data were analyzed, determining consistent trends between all the participant's perceptions of the processes involved in applying Alexander Technique in vocal production. These primarily involved improving body awareness through "body mapping," identifying physical habits that cause tension, and replacing these with natural freedom in movement. Furthermore, there was parity in perceptions on positive outcomes in vocal production, including ability to sustain notes and increase the range, fullness and quality of the voice. Minor disparities were indicated between perceptions on process, such as specific psychological focus and reference to personality. Links were found between perceptions articulated in interviews, journals and field observations regarding both process and outcomes. The results provide valuable knowledge that, alongside other similar studies, may inform the music education profession"--Document.

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